Treble.fm is a new social networking app for musicians who want to collaborate

0


A new app called Treble.fm which aims to connect musicians, songwriters and producers launched to the public today. Artists can create a profile, mark the musical categories they are expert in (such as piano, drums, engineer, or singer), then find other musicians to collaborate with based on their needs for a project and the physical location of the employee.

Using the app is a very straightforward process. After registering, I was asked to create my profile, where I could select up to three artist roles (I chose producer, DJ and engineer); link my relevant social accounts; connect my SoundCloud so that other artists in the app can hear my work; list my influences; then add a description for myself and what i was looking for.

Once my profile was completed, I was able to search for other artists based on their talents and their location in relation to me. I was also able to browse the newsletter section, where users can directly create reviews for both paid and unpaid opportunities. If there is an artist you want to speak with, a connection request must be sent and approved before you can communicate with them.

Trying to find musicians to collaborate with on a project, especially if their expertise is something outside of my normal sphere, can be a difficult process. (I know a lot of other producers, for example, but exactly no saxophonist.) Other apps I’ve tried are cluttered and don’t prioritize attaching things like YouTube and SoundCloud’s accounts. a user – the easiest ways to check someone’s abilities – resulting in bland text profiles that omit the most important part: the music.

In Treble.fm, a user’s biography, social media, SoundCloud songs, and a user’s login button are all on one clean page that can be visually personalized, and it’s all integrated so you never have to leave. the application. I found Treble.fm not only easy to use, but understood that requested connections had to be approved before any conversation could begin. This means that both parties have checked each other out and are interested in what the other person is creatively doing before they start talking.

Image: Treble.fm

Treble.fm founder Matt Bond acknowledges that other apps exist to bond musicians, like BandFriend and Jam Compass. “We’re not the first company to create a networking app for artists,” says Bond. “But most are built by technicians. We are artists with technical training and we understand what other artists are looking for. We have therefore created a simple and uncluttered experience that only takes these elements into account. Bond is betting on Treble.fm’s more streamlined interface that he says appeals to a younger audience, designed for “the type of people who use their Instagram as a calling card.”

The platform currently has around 2,000 users who were invited to use the app during its beta phase, and artists like OSHUN, Melo Makes Music, and Taylor Bennett have already used Treble.fm to connect with other musicians. . Bennett, in particular, is an active user and has used it to find musicians for a performance in New York. He then used the same musicians as the backing band for a second event, and even took them to Chicago for a third event. The first single from Bennett’s latest album, Restoration of an American Idol, was also facilitated by collaborations on Treble.fm.

Treble.fm is now available for free in the App Store.


Share.

Comments are closed.